Continuing Education Webinars Siemens logo
Webinar photo As part of Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics commitment to healthcare professionals, Siemens offers a series of complimentary educational webinars. To register for any upcoming events or to view an archived webinar at any time, click in the red box below. All programs are free, and many offer PACE® Continuing Education Credits for up to six months after the live event. Be sure to check back often for new event postings. 
Diabetes and the Cardiorenal Syndrome
Live Event Wednesday, November 11, 2015 at 1:00 PM Eastern
PACE® Credit available until May 11, 2016 | Florida Laboratory Credit available
RecordingView Slides
The statistics are staggering. Nearly 29.1 million children and adults are living with diabetes in the U.S., and nearly 8.1 million (27.8%) Americans remain undiagnosed.1 Additionally, approximately 26 million Americans have kidney disease and are unaware of their condition.2

Diabetes poses a significant clinical burden to patients. Left untreated, serious complications can occur such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, lower-limb amputation and pregnancy complications. According to the International Journal of Nephrology (IJN)3, Cardiorenal Syndrome (CRS) is the umbrella term used to describe clinical conditions in which cardiac and renal dysfunctions coexist whereby “acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other.”

A number of laboratory tests such as HbA1c, BNP, NT-proBNP, Albumin and Creatinine can assist clinicians in the management of this syndrome. Given the continued rise of diabetes in the U.S., healthcare professionals need to be well-informed about Cardiorenal Syndrome, its pathophysiology, its connection with diabetes and understand the latest recommended guidelines for diagnosis and treatment.

This webinar will analyze Cardiorenal Syndrome's pathophysiological connection with diabetes and identify the prevalence of diabetes and kidney diseases in the U.S. It will also examine the latest guidelines from leading research groups on this topic and apply learnings to Cardiorenal Syndrome case studies.

1 Center for Disease Control "National Diabetes Statistics Report", 2014
2 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; International Journal of Nephrology. 2011; 2011: 920195 (The Cardiorenal Syndrome: A Review)
3 International Journal of Nephrology. 2011; 2011: 920195 (The Cardiorenal Syndrome: A Review)
 

Key Learning Objectives:

  • Describe what Cardiorenal Syndrome is and its pathophysiological connection with diabetes
  • Identify the prevalence of diabetes and kidney diseases in the US
  • Examine the latest guidelines from leading research groups on this topic
  • Apply learnings to Cardiorenal Syndrome case studies

 

For information on Siemens solutions for diabetes testing, click here.

Presenter:
Nancy Haley PhD, Medical/Clinical Consultant
Nancy Haley
Dr. Nancy Haley was vice president and laboratory director at MetLife with responsibility for all laboratory testing and information for over 15 years. After a career at MetLife, she joined Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics in 2006 working as a Senior Clinical Consultant for the Scientific Marketing team providing seminars on emerging technologies, cardiovascular, diabetes, oncological, and infectious diseases. Currently Dr. Haley is a retired subject matter expert on these topics.

Dr. Haley has published over 150 articles in peer‐reviewed journals and has written over 15 chapters in educational texts. She has lectured at several international meetings on cardiology and cancer risk and has appeared on Good Morning America, the Late Show with David Letterman, and the ABC World News with Peter Jennings.
   
Diabetes Monitoring: Easy as A-1-C
Live Event Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at 1:00 PM Eastern
PACE® Credit available until July 14, 2015 | Florida Laboratory Credit available  
RecordingView Slides

Nearly 29.1 million children and adults are living with diabetes in the U.S., and nearly 8.1 million (27.8%) Americans remain undiagnosed1. Diabetes and its complications pose a significant clinical burden on the patient.  Left untreated, serious complications can occur such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, lower-limb amputation, and pregnancy complications.  With the correct treatment and recommended lifestyle changes, many people with diabetes are able to prevent or delay the onset of complications, and its associated economic toll.

A simple laboratory blood test for Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, or Glycosylated Hemoglobin) can aid clinicians in the management of this disease.  With the rise of diabetes in the U.S., healthcare professionals need to stay abreast of the latest recommended guidelines, and understand how HbA1c can positively impact the management of patients and improve their clinical outcomes.

1 National Diabetes Statistics Report, Center for Disease Control, June 20, 2014

 Key Learning Objectives:


  • Identify the prevalence and estimated costs of diabetes in the U.S.

  • Examine the facts and figures associated with the HbA1c testing segment.

  • Review the latest recommendations for diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes, including the CLIA requirements by lab classification for the HbA1C testing method.

  • Recognize the importance of the HbA1c test.

  • Discuss Analyze clinical value of HbA1c testing at the Point of Care.

 

For information on Siemens solutions for diabetes testing, click here.

Presenter:
Nancy Haley PhD, Sr. Medical/Clinical Consultant, Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics
Nancy Haley Photo
Dr. Haley was vice president and laboratory director at MetLife with responsibility for all laboratory testing and information. She joined Siemens in 2006. Currently, she is a member of the Scientific Marketing team in Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics and provides seminars on emerging technologies and cardiovascular, oncological, and infectious diseases.
   
Are DVT and PE Properly Diagnosed in your ED? The Evolution of D-dimer Testing
Live Event Wednesday, April 2, 2014 at 1:00 PM Eastern
PACE® Credit available until October 1, 2014 | Florida Laboratory Credit available for live session
RecordingView Slides
While approximately 10% of diagnosed acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients die within 60 minutes, prompt PE diagnosis and treatment can reduce the mortality rate dramatically. PE is so common and so lethal that it has been suggested that diagnosis be sought actively in every patient who presents with any chest symptoms that cannot be proven to have another cause.

Because PE symptoms vary so broadly, the diagnosis can be elusive. One study indicated that for roughly 60% of patients who died from PE, the cause of death was not established until after death, while only 7% of PE-related deaths were diagnosed while the patient was still alive.

Hospital Emergency Departments often have full waiting rooms, and clinicians need tests to either rule out or confirm diagnoses quickly. The D-dimer test has evolved into an accurate and rapid rule-out method and helps hospitals meet healthcare measures which focus on timely and effective care.

This webinar will discuss the most common ED presentations of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and PE, review underlying risks factors associated with DVT and PE, analyze the specific form of fibrin and its degradation products responsible for a positive D-dimer test, and analyze the D-dimer test's reliability, speed, accuracy, and clinical significance.

Key Learning Objectives:
  • Analyze the D-dimer test's reliability, speed, accuracy, and clinical significance
  • Review underlying risks factors associated with DVT and PE
  • Discuss the most common ED presentations of DVT and PE
  • Describe the specific form of fibrin and its degradation products responsible for a positive D-dimer test
Presenter:
Monet N. Sayegh, MD
Sr. Medical/Clinical Consultant
Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics
Monet Sahegh
Dr. Sayegh has over 20 years of experience in the fields of Medicine, Research, Surgery and Clinical Laboratory Science. His background includes extensive Immunology/Allergy, Hematology/Oncology, Endocrinology, Special Chemistry, HLA Histocompatiblity and Maternal screen. He has held key consulting positions focused on multiple laboratory disciplines, in both hospital and reference laboratories.
For information on Siemens solutions for D-dimer testing, click here.  
   
The Role of Testing in the Diagnosis & Management of Diabetes
Live Event Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 2:00 PM Eastern
PACE® Credit available until May 18, 2014 | Florida Laboratory Credit available for live session
RecordingView Slides
The World Health Organization estimates that more than 220 million people worldwide have diabetes. In the U.S. alone according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), nearly 26 million children and adults are living with diabetes, but nearly 7 million Americans (27%) are not aware they have the disease. Diabetes and its complications pose a significant clinical and financial burden. The ADA estimates the economic cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. is $245 billion dollars per year. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential to minimize long term diabetes complications.

Laboratory and point-of-care testing play a key role in the diagnosis and management of the diabetic patient. Healthcare providers need to stay informed about the latest recommendations regarding diabetes testing so they can best manage their patients and improve clinical outcomes.

Join us to learn about the prevalence, the various types, and major complications of diabetes, to review the various methods used in diagnosing the disease, to compare the tests used in the management of the disease, and analyze the latest recommendations and how these revisions may impact managing diabetes patients.

Key Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the prevalence, various types, and the major complications of diabetes
  • Review the methods used in diagnosing diabetes
  • Discuss the tests used in the management of the disease
  • Analyze the latest recommendations and how these revisions may impact managing diabetes patients

 

For information on Siemens solutions for diabetes testing, click here.

Presenter:
Monet N. Sayegh, MD
Sr. Medical/Clinical Consultant
Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics
Monet Sayegh
Dr. Sayegh has over 20 years of experience in the fields of Medicine, Research, Surgery and Clinical Laboratory Science. Background includes extensive Immunology/Allergy, Hematology/Oncology, Endocrinology, Special Chemistry, HLA Histocompatiblity and Maternal screen. He held key consulting positions focused on multiple laboratory disciplines, both hospital and reference laboratories.
   
IQCP: You Are More Ready Than You Know!
Live Event: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 at 1:00 PM Eastern
PACE® Credit available until April 1, 2014  |  Florida Laboratory Credit available for live session only
RecordingView Slides
Recently CMS announced that Indiviualized Quality Control Plans (IQCP) based on the CLSI EP23 guidance document will replace Equivalent Quality Control (EQC) effective January 1, 2014, and laboratories may initiate IQCP immediately. Despite the swift acceptance of the IQCP concept, few educational materials and practical documentation examples are readily available. Given the vast differences between a traditional quality control plan and IQCP, cautious laboratorians and point-of-care coordinators will need guidance before determining whether the IQCP path is right for their organization.

This webinar will focus on the “how-to” practical aspects of implementing an IQCP, and also demonstrate that with proper guidance, most laboratories already have the information they need to structure an IQCP.

The presentation will walk through the creation of an Individualized Quality Control Plan and the required support documentation a Lab Director or POC Coordinator will need to maintain compliance with the new regulation.

We will also review the evolution of EP-23 and IQCP, analyze the process of risk assessment and mitigation, illustrate how a risk assessment is performed and the use of tools to help the process flow, demonstrate the crafting of an IQCP document, and review case studies of IQCPs for common point of care tests.

Anyone involved in the practical aspects of creating and maintaining a quality control program will want to attend this valuable hour of practical knowledge and case study.

Key Learning Objectives:
  • Analyze the process of risk assessment and mitigation, and the use of data management tools to help the process flow
  • Illustrate how an IQCP risk assessment is performed
  • Demonstrate the crafting of an IQCP document
  • Review case studies of IQCPs for common point of care tests
  • Examine how data management can help gather necessary information and support your IQCP
Presenter:
Ginger Baker, MS, MT(AAB), Consultant
Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics 
Ginger Baker photo
Ginger Baker is a consultant in lean six-sigma laboratory operations, clinical informatics, and Point of Care Testing products and models. She is a writer for Advance Magazine and Acute Care, a contributor to CLSI, the Laboratory Operations Manager at St Peter’s Hospital in Helena, Montana, Chief of USA Business Development for BITAC MAP and a 2012 AACC Outstanding Speaker Award winner. She has been facilitating early adoption of clinical informatics to mistake-proof Point of Care Testing and ensure the highest level of performance to maximize patients care.
For information on Siemens solutions for data management, click here.
   
High Sensitivity Troponin: The Heart of Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes
Live Event: AACC 2013  |  ACCENT Credit Available
Recording
To improve clinical outcomes while reducing costs, hospitals must focus on their number-one financial strain—heart disease.* The burden of heart disease may be reduced by risk stratifying patients with chest pain, leveraging high-sensitivity troponin** testing at the point of care.

Two studies will be reviewed which support early detection of acute cardiovascular disease using a high-sensitivity troponin assay at the point of care. This can help improve outcomes as well as impact length of stay and mortality. In addition, we will review guidelines that provide a definition of optimal performance characteristics for troponin assays.


* According to the American Heart Association
** Defined by the ESC/ACC committee as an imprecision level of <=10% at the 99th percentile of normal


Key Learning Objectives:

  • Utilize evidence-based guidelines when evaluating potential POC cardiac analyzers
  • Recognize how the guidelines impact applying for Chest Pain Accreditation
  • Apply the best demonstrated practice for teaching/presenting information to your lab/hospital
  • Identify customer expectations of a sales team and find ways to utilize their knowledge and testing tools to meet laboratory service goals



To receive your ACCENT credit, please click here
1 ACCENT credit will be emailed to you after you complete the survey

Presenter:
Sammie Sue Hendrix, BS MT(ASCP), MBA
Laboratory Director, Citizens Med. Center
Victoria, Texas

Sammie Sue Picture
Throughout her almost 30 years at Citizens Medical Center, Ms. Hendrix has championed several automated and computerized solutions that have improved processes, increased efficiency, and accelerated productivity. She has been a guest speaker and panelist at numerous professional conferences and forums. Ms. Hendrix is an adjunct faculty member at Victoria College and serves as chairman of the college’s Medical Laboratory Technology Advisory Committee.
 
   
Is Your Lab Adding Value to Cardiac Care or Just Reporting Numbers?
Live Event: December 12, 2012 at 1:00 PM Eastern
PACE® Credit available until: June 11, 2013 | Florida Laboratory Credit available for live session only
RecordingView Slides
Event Description: Presenter:
Sammie Sue Hendrix,
BS MT (ASCP), MBA
Laboratory Director, Citizens Med. Center
Victoria, Texas
Sammie Sue Hendrix Pic
Throughout her almost 30 years at Citizens Medical Center, Ms. Hendrix has championed several automated and computerized solutions that have improved processes, increased efficiency, and accelerated productivity. She has been a guest speaker and panelist at numerous professional conferences and forums. Ms. Hendrix is an adjunct faculty member at Victoria College and serves as chairman of the college’s Medical Laboratory Technology Advisory Committee.
Hospitals are continuously challenged to improve clinical outcomes while reducing costs. According to the American Heart Association, heart disease presents the number one financial strain on the American Healthcare system. For this reason, healthcare reform has focused on this disease state. One of the most common methods utilized to risk stratify patients who present with chest pain is the use of a point-of-care cardiac analyzer that measures high-sensitive troponin. This is because early detection of active cardiac disease using a high-sensitive troponin at the point of care can help improve clinical outcomes.

This webinar will help you identify effective strategies for partnering with your laboratory and cardiology services that are also challenged with improving clinical outcomes. In addition, you will gain insight into creative ways to determine the most practical point of care cardiac testing locations for your hospital as well as discuss various ways to establish new cut-off points when adopting high-sensitive troponin testing.

Key Learning Objectives:
  • Review evidence based guidelines that should be used when evaluating potential POC cardiac analyzers
  • Analyze the ways in which these guidelines impact Chest Pain Accreditation
  • Review best demonstrated practice for teaching / presenting information to your lab/hospital
  • Identify customer expectations of a sales team to best utilize their knowledge and testing tools to meet laboratory service goals
For information on Siemens solutions that can help you add value to your hospital's cardiac care, click here.
   
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