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Clinical Laboratory Education 
Learning at your convenience. On your schedule.

 
 
  Fisher Healthcare offers a number of educational webinars throughout the year on a wide range of practical topics directed toward healthcare professionals. You can register for upcoming sessions here, or watch archived webinar recordings at any time, from anywhere. These complimentary basic level events are delivered by respected leaders in the world of healthcare, and managed by Whitehat Communications to ensure a professional environment. All programs are free and offer one PACE® Continuing Education contact hour for up to six months after the live event. Check back often for new event postings. 
H. pylori Diagnosis: Considerations for Selecting the Appropriate
Testing Methodology
Live Event: Wednesday, December 5, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until June 5, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides
In the United States, 20% of the population under 30 and 50% of the population over 60 are infected with H. pylori. H. pylori infections may be asymptomatic, but can lead to dyspepsia or serious complications such as duodenal and gastric ulcers, an increased risk of gastric cancer and higher rates of mucosal associated lymphoid-type lymphoma.

Several invasive and non-invasive methodologies are currently available for determining current infection, before and after eradication therapy. Each testing methodology for H. pylori poses advantages and disadvantages to the laboratory, patient, and institution. In this webinar, we explore how to select the appropriate testing methodology by balancing performance, economics, workflow, and patient care.



This webinar will:
Evaluate the appropriate testing methodology by balancing performance, economics, and workflow
Discuss the best patient care by providing accurate results for appropriate care within a test-treat-test framework, while also taking into account economic and convenience considerations for the patient
Examine the process of protecting the economic health and reputation of the institution while providng the best patient care

Presenter:
David Lyerly, PhD
Chief Scientific Officer
TECHLAB
David Lyerly Photo
David Lyerly, Ph.D. has published >120 peer-reviewed publications on intestinal disease. He is a frequent invited speaker at regional, national, and international meetings and an invited reviewer for numerous journals and committees.
Implementing Next-Generation Sequencing for Precision Oncology Testing
Live Event: Thursday, November 29, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until May 29, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides
According to a recent study by the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, the majority of cancer treatments in the pipeline have an associated genomic biomarker and this trend is expected to increase in the coming years. With this evolution in the clinical oncology landscape, academic medical centers and hospital systems alike have adopted diagnostic precision medicine tools like next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS enables labs to rapidly and simultaneously test many genomic biomarkers from just a few nanograms of precious formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical specimens. As the number of clinically actionable biomarkers continues to expand, these approaches will continue to play a critical diagnostic role in the clinical laboratory setting.

In this webinar, our expert speaker will highlight the clinical and economic considerations for implementing an NGS-based personalized medicine program and discuss case studies that demonstrate the benefits of broad genomic profiling across a wide variety of cancer types.



This webinar will:
Describe the decision making process in deciding whether to implement next-generation sequencing in a clinical pathology lab setting
Identify the variety of testing strategies and chemistries available
Review example case studies where NGS is uniquely suited to provide novel clinical insights

Presenter:
Brian D. Piening, PhD
Associate Director, Providence St. Joseph Health (PSJH), Molecular Genomics Laboratory
Brian Piening Photo
Dr. Piening is currently the Associate Director of the Providence St. Joseph Health (PSJH) Molecular Genomics Laboratory and Assistant Member and head of the Tumor Immunogenomics Laboratory at the Earle A. Chiles Research Institute and Providence Cancer Center in Portland, OR.
The Status of Microsatellite Instability Testing and its Role in Colorectal Cancer
Live Event: Monday, November 19, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until May 19, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides
Microsatellite Instability (MSI) is a hyper-mutation phenotype resulting from mutations in one or more mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. MSI testing has been a rapidly evolving field, both in terms of clinical applications for MSI testing as well as methodologies available to perform MSI testing. In the first portion of his talk, Dr. Mackinnon will provide an update on the current state of MSI testing.

As requests for MSI evaluation increase, it will be important for labs to be able to perform MSI testing in a timely and accurate manner. Traditional molecular testing techniques for MSI are often challenging to perform. They require high levels of operator expertise as well as analysis of a normal tissue components, since the traditional biomarkers are not tumor specific.

Dr. Mackinnon has evaluated a novel set of MSI biomarkers that are analyzed by fully automated testing platform, making MSI testing accessible to virtually any lab. He will present the performance data from a cross-platform comparison of IHC and two different molecular MSI evaluation methods and share results for 50 colorectal cancer samples tested by all three methods.



This webinar will:
•  Describe the two main testing strategies for MSI testing
Identify the reasons/clinical applications for performing MSI testing and what MSI-High vs. Microsatellite Stable (MSS) results means
Analyze the performance of three MSI testing technologies, i.e., IHC + 2 molecular testing methods


Presenter:
Alexander Craig Mackinnon, MD PhD
Associate Professor of Pathology
Director, Clinical and Translational Research Core Lab
Alexander Mackinnon Photo
Dr. Mackinnon is an Associate Professor of Pathology and the current Director of the Clinical and Translational Research Core Laboratory at Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, WI. He received his bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Colorado and his master’s degree in neuroscience from Northwestern University where he spent time researching Alzheimer’s Disease. He went on to receive both his MD and PhD in Cell and Structural Biology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
The Impact of Flexible Panel-Based Solutions for Pathogen Detection
Live Event: Wednesday, November 7, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until May 7, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides
The development of molecular testing methods for pathogen detection has led to improved sensitivity, specificity and turnaround time compared with traditional culture-based methods of analysis. However, current commercially available molecular tests can be limited by the number of set pathogenic markers. This means that if a result is not conclusive, additional testing may be required – leading to increased time to answer, and additional cost.

Panel-based, syndromic approaches to pathogen detection can present numerous benefits to the clinical laboratory – including simplification in ordering, testing of multiple pathogens above and beyond the “usual suspects”, ease of use, rapid turnaround time, and reduced need to send-out samples to other laboratories.

This webinar will provide you with the knowledge to understand the economic and laboratory operational impact of using syndromic panels in pathogen detection, and how this type of testing can be implemented in the laboratory. Dr Schutzbank will lead a panel discussion of laboratories from around the world that have implemented flexible content syndromic testing for pathogen detection testing. To help illustrate specific case studies in this area, Dr Sandeep Mukherjee will then discuss the application of this in bacterial vaginitis investigations, and Dr Li will discuss how this can impact respiratory pathogen detection.


This webinar will:
Discuss the impact of flexible content syndromic panels from a laboratory operational perspective
Describe how flexible content syndromic panels affects the number of reflex tests the laboratory due to test consolidation
Analyze the effects of flexible content syndromic panels on laboratory costs

Presenters:  
Ted Schutzbank Ted E. Schutzbank PhD
Laboratory Dir., Quantigen Genomic Services
   
Kelly Li  Kelly Li Ph.D.
Sr. Applications Scientist
Life Sciences Solutions
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Sandeep Mukherjee  Sandeep Mukherjee Ph.D.
Scientific Director
Women’s Health & Infectious Diseases
PathGroup 
100 Years Since the Spanish Flu: Current Standards for Flu Pandemic Preparedness
Live Event: Tuesday, October 16, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until April 16, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides
Last year’s influenza season was a challenging one with a recorded higher prevalence of infection caused by what had been considered a less virulent strain of the virus. This was compounded by a vaccine that did not appear to be as effective against that particular strain along with higher infant mortality and hospital admittance rates than had been predicted. As a result of the higher prevalence of illness, there was a shortage in the availability of rapid influenza tests which many clinics and physicians experienced.

In this P.A.C.E.®-accredited Fisher Healthcare webinar, Dr.Sally Hojvat will discuss the FDA's reclassification of rapid flu tests in detail. She will also discuss how our understanding of the flu has advanced over the past 100 years, and how we've been able to improve vaccination strategies, surveillance, and our preparedness for future pandemics.


This webinar will:
Discuss the importance of having reliable, high performing diagnostic tests, especially for higher risk patients
Describe how the FDA monitors compliance with the recently updated performance standards for rapid flu tests
Explain how to determine whether a test meets FDA-required sensitivity and specificity
Identify the most suitable tests for different testing scenarios
Review the pros and cons of molecular and serological tests, plus manual and automated platforms

                    
This session is sponsored by:
Fisher Sekisui logo
Presenter:
Sally Hojvat, PhD
Senior Consultant, Partners in Diagnostics
Sally Hojvat Photo
Dr. Sally Hojvat holds a PhD in Biochemistry from Loyola University, before spending nearly two decades in the Diagnostic Division of Abbott Laboratories. She then worked 12 years for the FDA as the Director of the Division of Microbiology Devices and currently consults for the World Health Organization (WHO) and other non-profit and commercial IVD companies.
Learn Lean: Simple Ways to Improve Lab Efficiency and Accuracy
Live Event: Thursday, October 4, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until April 4, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides   
Reimbursement for many tests is being reduced year by year, and the CMS has stated that this will continue through 2020. Laboratories must become more efficient. One way is to apply the proven Lean principles in designing the way the work and the laboratory is structured.

Lean Manufacturing is based on principles that differ from the way histology has been organized and practiced over the years. It is based on small batches and limited inventory. The basics and the tools are easy to learn, with a slight adjustment in the way we think about organizing our work. By applying the thought process and some of the tools, many laboratories have made significant advances in their efficiency. It is quite possible to make a start with just the basic training and some clear thinking.

This webinar is designed to provide that training. It will review and redefine workflow in ways that will identify improvements, and identify and implement ways of making workflow more efficient.



This webinar will:
Describe the basic principles underlying Lean workflow planning
Identify and discuss the tools of Lean Manufacturing
Apply these principles to the laboratory to improve efficiency, reduce costs, and reduce the risk of errors

Presenter:
Peter Kilner
Global Market Development Manager
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Peter Kilner Photo
Peter Kilner is a Global Market Development Manager with Thermo Fisher Scientific. He has previously held the posts of Marketing Manager in the USA and in Europe, as well as Product Manager for tissue processing and staining equipment.
Liquid Based Microbiology:
Simplify Sample Collection and Transport to Improve Patient Care
Live Event: Wednesday, August 29, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until February 28, 2019  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording View Slides
There are many challenges facing the clinical microbiology laboratory today and tremendous pressure to perform quality testing efficiently while limiting additional cost to the medical institution. Many laboratories are being asked to streamline sample collection products due to consolidation. In doing so, laboratories must strategically evaluate each sample to determine the best type of collection and transport system.

SWABS
Traditionally, swab samples are collected using dacron or rayon swabs which consist of yards of fiber wrapped around an applicator stick. Using these swabs much of the patient sample becomes trapped in the matrix of fiber. The result is that up to 90% of the sample stays with the swab and is unavailable for testing. Fiber wrapped swabs are also challenging to use on automated specimen processors without manual intervention.

FECES
Currently, after collecting the fecal sample, a quantity (typically 1-2 grams) of feces is placed into a transport media tube. This process can be unpleasant and messy. Traditional fecal containers are large and bulky and not ideal for streamlined collection, transport or automation.

SPUTUM
Sputum is a challenging sample in the microbiology laboratory as it can be very viscous and difficult to manage. To liquefy for easier manual or automated specimen processing, liquefying solutions are often used. These reagents are mixed in large batches which may go to waste if not used within 48 hours.

URINE
Urine containers come in a variety of different shapes and sizes. The vacuum style containers require the additional step of placing the sample into a more automation friendly container/tube.

This webinar will give an overview of these approaches and review published studies comparing the new technologies to gold-standard methods.


This webinar will:
Identify the resources available to validate, convert and train users on Liquid Based Microbiology (LBM) products
Analyze clinical studies and impact of LBM products on microbiology laboratories across the world
Discuss LBM products and understand how they impact automation in clinical microbiology
Presenter:
Susan Sharp, PhD., (D)ABMM, (F)AAM, MS, MT(ASCP)
Director of Scientific Affairs
Copan Diagnostics, Inc.
Susan Sharp Photo
Dr. Sharp received her B.S. in Medical Technology and her M.S. in Medical Microbiology & Biochemistry from the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. She received her Ph.D. in Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology from the Veterinary School of Medicine, Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. She then did a 2-year post-doctorate fellowship in Clinical Microbiology in the Department of Pathology, Division of Microbiology, at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut.






Considerations in UTI Detection and its Potential Impact on Antibiotic Stewardship
Live Event: Tuesday, July 24, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until January 23, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a leading cause of health care visits. Consequently, urine specimens are one of the most frequent specimen types submitted to laboratories, yet the majority of specimens prove to be negative for UTI after evaluation by standard methods. Plate-based culturing remains the gold standard for UTI detection, requiring 24-48 hours before results are available. Urinalysis (UA) is an automated approach that provides more rapid results than standard culturing, but this method can suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity, resulting in the improper management of patient care.

There are newer technologies available today that improve our ability to detect UTI faster with higher specificity. These include mass spectrometry and a newly approved technology that uses laser light scatter to detect low density bacterial infection. By providing robust results in a shorter timeframe, the level of unnecessary administration of empiric antibiotics should be greatly reduced, facilitating antibiotic stewardship and, ultimately, improving patient care. This webinar will give an overview of these approaches and review published studies comparing the new technologies to gold-standard methods.


This webinar will:
Describe the traditional and advanced diagnostic methods for UTI and their impact on patient diagnosis.
Examine the role urinary tract infections play in inappropriate antibiotic use and increasing antibiotic resistance.
Discuss the healthcare burden of UTIs in terms of dollars, time, and health outcomes
Presenter:
Erin H. Graf, Ph.D., D(ABMM), Director Infectious Disease Diagnostics Laboratory
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Erin Graf Photo
Dr. Graf is the Director of the Infectious Disease Diagnostics Laboratory at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She is also an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Graf completed her Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania studying HIV latency. Dr. Graf is board certified in medical microbiology. Her research interests include sequence-based diagnostics in clinical microbiology, including the applications of next generation sequencing and metagenomics, as well as emerging technologies for rapid diagnostics.
Influenza Testing and the FDA Reclassification: Where do We Go from Here? 
Live Event: Wednesday, June 6, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until December 5, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides 
FDA Influenza Reclassification went into full effect in January 2018. This change placed additional requirements on influenza lateral flow assay manufactures. As a result,, some assays were removed from the market.

This change in influenza assay availability challenged some testing facilities to adjust their assay use, or to purchase excess inventory for the 2017/2018 influenza season. Now that the 2017/2018 influenza season has passed, testing facilities that did not implement an FDA-approved test will need determine their influenza testing plans for the 2018/2019 influenza season and beyond.

This educational webinar will review flu testing challenges faced during the 2017/2018 influenza season, including discussion on the management and mitigation of highly seasonal testing and a review of testing options for the 2018/2019 season. The session will also analyze the pros and cons of each type of influenza testing. 


This webinar will:
Review FDA Influenza Reclassification Requirements to provide understanding of changes following the January 2018 enforcement date
Identify the different types of influenza tests available, following FDA Influenza Reclassification
Analyze the pros and cons of each type of influenza testing
Discuss the 2017/2018 influenza season and lessons learned to prepare for future season
Presenter:
Gregory J. Berry, Ph.D., D(ABMM)
Director, Molecular Diagnostics
Assistant Director, Division of Infectious Disease Diagnostics
Northwell Health Laboratories
Greg Berry photo
Dr. Berry is a Diplomate of the American Board of Medical Microbiology and an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell. He is also the Director of Molecular Diagnostics and an Assistant Director of Infectious Disease Diagnostics at Northwell Health Laboratories in New York.
Reducing Time to Result for Urinary Tract Pathogen Detection
Utilizing Real-Time PCR Technology
Live Event: Wednesday, May 30, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until November 29, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
Although widely used, culture-based methods for the detection of pathogens involved in Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) can lack sensitivity resulting in the possibility of pathogens not being detected. They can also be subjective leading to misinterpretation of results, take a long time resulting in reduced lab efficiency, and they have been shown to miss a significant percentage of positive cases. In fact, some studies show that almost 30% of positive cases are missed using culture-based methods

A molecular alternative to culture-based methods, real-time PCR technology, increases specificity and sensitivity, with over 25% increased accuracy in urinary tract pathogen detection when compared to culture methods in under 5 hours. Real-time PCR in pathogen detection can identify slow-growing, difficult-to-cultivate microorganisms, and can be used when culture-based techniques are inadequate, ambiguous, time-consuming, difficult, and/or too costly. Clinical validation data demonstrated that when compared with urine specimen culture, real-time PCR detected 97% of samples where urinary tract pathogens were present, vs culture which detected only 71% of cases where pathogens were present.1

This webinar will compare molecular testing for urinary tract pathogen detection to traditional culture-based testing methods, examine the sensitivity, specificity and turnaround time of molecular testing techniques for UTI pathogen detection, and discuss the current impact of UTI’s in the US and globally, including health economic impacts and how new testing methods can potentially impact laboratory efficiency.

1For research use only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

This webinar will:
Compare molecular testing for urinary tract pathogen detection to traditional culture-based testing methods
Examine the sensitivity, specificity and turnaround time of molecular testing techniques for UTI pathogen detection
Discuss the current impact of UTI’s in the US and globally, including health economic impacts and how new testing methods can potentially impact laboratory efficiency
Presenter:
David Baunoch, PhD
President and Chief Executive Officer Pathnostics
David Baunoch photo
:
With over 25 years of laboratory experience, Dr. Baunoch has extensive experience in all areas of Lab Services. Dr. Baunoch received his PhD in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from Wayne State University and completed a NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship in Breast Cancer Research at the Michigan Cancer Foundation. He is widely published, with over 25 peer-reviewed publications.
Clostridium difficile Infection Guideline Update: Understanding the Data Behind the Recommendations
Live Event: Tuesday, May 8, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until November 7, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
In a healthcare environment like a hospital or nursing home, Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) can be spread quickly through touching contaminated surfaces or by person-to-person contact. C. difficile causes an inflammation of the colon that can lead to serious, life-threatening conditions, especially in immunocompromised or elderly patients. The problem is so widespread, C. difficile infection (CDI) is linked to more than 30,000 deaths a year in the United States — rivaling the 32,000 killed in traffic accidents.

The demands for C. difficile testing have continued to evolve over the last several years. While the focus had been increasingly on the need for highly accurate detection of the organism, there has been a renewed interest in the detection of the toxins that cause the disease. Colonized C. difficile carriers are 5-10 times more common than patients with active infections in hospitals. Treating carriers is often ineffective and increases the risk to the patient of developing C. difficile diarrhea.

C. difficile infections pose a serious threat and require rapid clinical decisions. This webinar will review the 2017 IDSA/SHEA CDI guideline update treatment recommendations, describe how the 2017 IDSA/SHEA CDI guideline update recommendations on C. difficile diagnostics will apply to a patient population, and identify how the microbiology laboratory can assist in C. difficile infection prevention.

This webinar will:
Review the 2017 IDSA/SHEA CDI guideline update treatment recommendations
Describe how the 2017 IDSA/SHEA CDI guideline update recommendations on C. difficile diagnostics will apply to a patient population
Identify how the microbiology laboratory can assist in C. difficile infection prevention

Presenter:
Erik Dubberke, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO
Eric Dubberke Photo
Dr. Dubberke is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where he has been a faculty member in the Division of Infectious Diseases since 2005. His main research interests are in the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). He is the lead author of the CDI component of the SHEA compendium to prevent healthcare associated infections, and is a panel member on the update of the SHEA/IDSA CDI clinical guidelines.
Anti-Heparin Platelet Factor 4 Antibodies: Risking a Potentially Catastrophic Occurrence
Live Event: Thursday, April 5, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until October 4, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
As many as 5% of patients treated with heparin have an immune complex that is formed between Heparin and Platelet Factor 4 (PF4). These patients may develop Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT), characterized by a low platelet count that can result in excessive bleeding or clotting. Of those diagnosed with HIT, 30% are at risk for death and 20% are at risk for limb amputation.

Current testing for HIT can take several hours to several days for the results. During this time, patients requiring surgery must wait for the test results to determine if heparin can be administered, or they are given expensive direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI’s) as a precautionary measure.

This webinar will describe the mechanism of interaction between heparin and platelet factor 4, review the chemistry of heparin, and identify the consequences of antibodies to Heparin Platelet Factor 4. It will also examine the testing methodology for the anti-Platelet Factor 4 Heparin antibody.


This webinar will:
Describe the mechanism of interaction between Heparin and Platelet Factor 4
Review the chemistry of Heparin
Identify the consequences of antibodies to the Heparin Platelet Factor 4
Examine the testing methodology for the anti-Platelet Factor 4 Heparin anti-body

This webinar is sponsored by Fisher and Akers Logo  
Presenter:
Michael Warhol, MD
Past President , Pennsylvania Association of Pathologists
Fellow of the American College of Pathology
Michael Warhol Photo
Dr. Warhol received his undergraduate degree at Princeton University and his M.D. degree from the University of Pittsburgh. He continued his residency training in pathology at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, MA. He served as Chairman and Director of Laboratories at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, PA and New York Hospital Queens.
Empowering STAT DNA Testing for Molecular Oncology Applications using a Fully Automated Platform
Live Event: Thursday, March 15, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until September 14, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
Turnaround time remains a major issue in molecular biomarker testing. Current technologies are complex, require a lot of hands-on time and are often difficult to implement in the local laboratory. These factors significantly extend the time until the result report becomes available.

This webinar will provide firsthand perspectives about how new technologies can help improve turnaround times in virtually any lab. Dr. Tsongalis will discuss his experiences with fully -automated molecular biomarker analysis by presenting results from a recent performance study. He will also share his views on validation requirements for such a platform.




This webinar will:
Discuss the reasons for the need for improvement in TAT when it comes to testing Oncology biomarkers.
Compare the performance of a fully-automated qPCR-based system to that of a Next-Generation Sequencing based system
Identify validation strategies for implementing fully automated biomarker-testing systems in a CLIA setting.

Presenter: 
Gregory J. Tsongalis, PhD, HCLD, CC
Professor of Pathology
Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center
Lebanon, NH
Greg Tsongalis
Dr. Tsongalis' research interests are in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, disease association of SNP genotyping and personalized medicine. He has authored/edited 11 textbooks in the field of molecular pathology, published more than 200 peer reviewed manuscripts, and has been an invited speaker at both national and international meetings.
Understanding Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Treatment Options
Live Event: Tuesday, January 9, 2018  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until July 8, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
For patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the current standard of practice is to start initial empiric antimicrobial therapy using broad-spectrum antibiotics with the goal to cover the most likely etiologies. Since the initial standard microbiological work-up fails to identify a definitive etiology in the majority of patients, most patients are continued on broad-spectrum antibiotics for the full duration of therapy. This empiric current antimicrobial approach exposes patients to more antimicrobials than necessary, eradicates a significant proportion of organisms belonging to the normal host flora (collateral damage), and selects for antimicrobial resistant pathogens.

However, with advances of diagnostic tests (including immunochromatographic-based urinary antigen and molecular assays) which can identify respiratory pathogens of CAP earlier in the course of management and with the potential for identifying specific pathogens in a greater proportion of patients, it is now possible to provide early treatment with a narrower, focused antimicrobial regimen that targets the identified pathogens. In those who have been begun on broader coverage, antibiotics can be reduced or “de-escalated.” This pathogen-directed therapy will ultimately lead to a new paradigm of “targeted antimicrobial” treatment that will permit selection of agents against a specific pathogen and substantially reduce exposure of individuals and hospitals to antimicrobial agents with decreased selection of antimicrobial resistance, cost, and adverse events.

This webinar will:
List the differences between empirical and pathogen-directed therapy for community-acquired pneumonia
Review pathogens responsible for community-acquired pneumonia
Analyze the diagnostics and treatment options available for community-acquired pneumonia
Identify advantages of rapid diagnostic methods for community-acquired pneumonia
Presenter:
Thomas M. File, Jr., MD MSc. MACP FIDSA FCCP
Chief of the Infectious Disease Service
Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio
Tom File Photo
Thomas M. File Jr., MD is Chief of the Infectious Disease Service and Director of HIV Research at Summa Health System in Akron. Ohio, and Professor of Internal Medicine and Master Teacher at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine in Rootstown, Ohio.
Using Modern Technology to Surveil, Monitor, and Diagnose Infectious Disease
Live Event: Monday, December 18, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until June 18, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
There is a growing need for accurate and timely information about the status of infectious disease in a community, county or state. Such information will alert physicians, hospital administrators, medical and laboratory directors, and public health agencies, and can enable preventive measures and/or improved patient care and management. Modern surveillance technology shows great promise in fulfilling this need by sending results in near real-time for influenza, RSV, and Strep A tests to the CDC, state departments of health, and healthcare organizations nation-wide.

This webinar will discuss recent technological advances that have afforded certain FDA-cleared rapid point of care instruments that aid in the diagnosis of infectious disease the capability to wirelessly convey near real-time results and transmit to public health agencies and organizations for use in de-identified surveillance and laboratory management. The utility for laboratory management, featuring quality control, training, resource management, and operator performance will be discussed, as will the impact of valid real-time data on the management of patients and the timely and appropriate use of antivirals and antibiotics. Promising new applications of data in developing enhanced disease forecasting and the benefits this promises for public health, healthcare systems, pharmacies and others will be also be considered.

This webinar will:
Identify technology that allows certain FDA-cleared, rapid-POC testing instruments to wirelessly transmit to public authorities
Describe how labs can use the technology for quality control, training and resource management
Analyze the impact of valid real-time data on patient care management, including the use of antivirals and antibiotics
Discuss promising new applications of data to enhance disease forecasting and its benefits for various stakeholders

Presenter:
John Tamerius, PhD
Sr. Vice President, Strategic and External Affairs, Quidel Corp.
John Tamerius Photo
Dr. John Tamerius graduated from the Univ. of Washington (Seattle, Washington) with a Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology. He performed graduate and postdoctoral research in tumor immunology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center (Seattle) before joining the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation (San Diego, California) as a Research Associate in the Dept. of Molecular Immunology.
Meeting the Standards:
Mandatory FDA Reclassification Of Rapid Influenza Detection Tests
Live Event: Monday, November 6, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until May 6, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
FDA Tightens Standards, Reclassifies RIDTs
There have historically been some challenges with rapid immunoassay detection test (RIDTs) for influenza and their variability in performance. While they tend to show good specificity, they can deliver less-than-optimal sensitivity in respiratory specimens compared to RT-PCR or viral culture.
In some cases (for example, the H1N1 flu strain in 2009) RIDTs may be unable to detect the virus at all. For this reason, negative RIDT test results should be interpreted with caution given the potential for false negative results - especially during peak flu season in a community.

Based on these concerns, the FDA began work to reclassify antigen-based RIDTs as Class II devices in order to improve the overall quality of testing for influenza. The FDA has provided certain performance criteria that manufacturers will have to meet in order to market their influenza assays.

What Does the FDA Reclassification Mean for RIDT Manufacturers?
Manufacturers must obtain a new 510(k) clearance and demonstrate compliance with the special controls included in the new clinical performance standards before marketing antigen-based RIDTs.

What Does the FDA Reclass Mean for Physicians and Labs?
Facilities testing for flu can still continue to purchase their current product up until January 12, 2018 and utilize them until the kit’s expiration date. This provides facilities enough time to assess the performance data against the FDA criteria and engage clinicians and management on the next course of action for flu testing.

This webinar will:
Describe the FDA reclassification of rapid immunoassay detection tests (RIDT’s) for 2018
Discuss the reason for FDA’s implementation of the new reclassification and how that impacts not only manufacturers but also the physician, the laboratory, and the patient
Identify the information RIDT users must have from manufacturers to determine whether or not their current testing meets the reclassification
Presenter:
Sally Hojvat, PhD
Sally Hojvat Photo
Sally Hojvat holds an MSc in Microbiology/ Food Science from the University of Alberta and a PhD in Biochemistry from Loyola University. She has completed post-doctorate work in clinical chemistry and pharmacology, worked for the FDA, and has extensive experience working for a major international IVD manufacturer.



Get the Most Out Of Barcoding In Your Pathology Laboratory
Live Event: Wednesday, October 25, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until April 25, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
Barcoding is used everywhere in our culture today to prevent errors. In laboratories, barcoding has become an evidence based “best practice” for reducing errors and improving productivity where up to 70% of all errors occur in the pre- and post-analytic phases. Besides improving productivity, barcoding opens up many new opportunities to utilize the embedded data downstream through multiple stages up to and including long-term storage and archiving.

This webinar will offer a practical approach to implementing a barcoding solution to meet the needs of your individual laboratory for protecting the integrity of patients’ specimens. With US Healthcare moving from a Fee-for-Service model to a Value-Based system, laboratories must implement ways of improving quality outcomes. The additional benefit barcoding delivers is an improvement in productivity and reduction, to the point of elimination of non-value added tasks. Barcoding utilized along with lean processes has also been proven to reduce labeling errors to near zero in pathology laboratories.

This webinar will:
Describe how reimbursement impacts technology utilization in the laboratory
Differentiate between linear and 2D barcodes and how each captures patient data
Review techniques labs employ to adapt barcoding to their varying sizes and budgets
Illustrate the ways in which barcoding affects a pathology laboratory's workflow and productivity









Presenter:
Loretta Sayles
Sayles Lab Consulting
Loretta Sayles Photo
Loretta Sayles has spent the past 30 plus years working in the anatomic pathology laboratory arena in several different aspects of our business. She currently is the Managing Director of Sayles Lab Consulting which focuses on helping labs improve their quality while understanding the challenging healthcare market. Loretta is very active in Histotechnology on both the national and state level and has been recognized for her dedication to the field.
The Journey to Realizing the Promise of Precision Medicine
Live Event: Tuesday, October 17, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until April 17, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
Recording
Drs. William's & Conley's Slides
Dr. Triche's Slides
Currently, clinical labs are doing sequential, single-analyte testing in oncology which exhausts precious patient samples and extends the turnaround time to results. Clinicians can wait for as long as two to three weeks to get a result. And, if the sample is insufficient for molecular testing, patients can be subject to expensive and painful rebiopsies. Pathologists and other clinicians need a better, faster way to consolidate their molecular testing into a single assay and get results within a week.

This webinar will show how Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is helping labs save precious samples and provide rapid results. It will review the updates on the NCI-MATCH clinical trial for adult cancers and the development of a gene panel specific to pediatric cancers, and it will discuss a laboratory's implementation of next-generation sequencing for cancer clinical research.




This webinar will:
Review the updates on the NCI-MATCH clinical trial for adult cancers and the development of a gene panel specific to pediatric cancers
Analyze the effects of next-generation sequencing on the speed of results from the clinical/pathology lab to oncologists to minimize the need for a painful and expensive rebiopsy
Discuss a laboratory's implementation of next-generation sequencing for cancer clinical research

Presenters:
Tim Triche PhotoTimothy Triche, MD, PhD, Pathologist; Co-Director, Center for Personalized Medicine Program (CPM) Professor of Pathology and Pediatrics, USC Keck School of Medicine

Mickey Williams PhotoMickey Williams, PhD
Director, Molecular Characterization Laboratory, National Cancer Institute

Barbara ConleyBarbara A. Conley, MD Special Volunteer / Contractor, National Cancer Institute
HIV Trends, Guideline Recommendations, & the Evolution of Rapid HIV Screening Tests 
Live Event: Thursday, September 28, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until March 28, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that 14 percent of people infected with HIV in the United States - more than 168,000 people1 - are unaware of their infection. Of the estimated 50,000 new HIV infections each year, thousands are transmitted by people who do not know that they are HIV-positive.2,3

With the successful introduction of antiviral drugs, HIV screening and testing has become a cornerstone for prevention and treatment. For those who test positive, it opens the door to life-saving treatment and reduces the transmission of HIV to others. And for those who test negative, they can take preventative measures to ensure they remain negative.

Through the years, HIV screening tests have improved in performance and ease of use but not all HIV tests are equal. The CDC in 2014 updated their recommendations on HIV testing to include screening with a 4th generation lab test. This webinar will review the evolution of HIV screening tests, identify differences in HIV testing methodologies, review current CDC and HRSA guidelines for HIV testing, screening, and analysis, and develop strategies within one’s own institution to increase screening for HIV.

1 CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data - United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas - 2012. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2014;19(No. 3). Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports. Published November 2014. (Accessed November 25, 2014).
2 CDC. Estimated HIV incidence among adults and adolescents in the United States, 2007-2010. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012;17(No. 4). Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/ttsupplemental. Published December 2012.
3 Hall HI, Holtgrave DR, and Maulsby C. HIV transmission rates from persons living with HIV who are aware and unaware of their infection. AIDS 2012;26(7):893-96. 




This webinar will:
Review current CDC and HRSA guidelines for HIV testing/screening/analysis and importance of early detection
Determine the patient population that can benefit from rapid point-of-care testing for HIV antigen/antibody
Develop strategies within one’s own institution to increase screening for HIV
Apply current guidelines and best practices to improve the care of patients who are HIV positive and HIV negative
Presenter:
Neil W. Anderson, MD
Assistant Professor, Washington University School of Medicine, and
Asst Medical Dir, Clinical Microbiology,
Barnes Jewish Hospital
St. Louis, Missouri
Neil Anderson photo
Neil Anderson completed his training in anatomic and clinical pathology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, followed by a fellowship in clinical microbiology at Mayo Clinic. He currently is an assistant professor at Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine and is the assistant medical director of clinical microbiology at Barnes Jewish Hospital. His areas of academic pursuit include the serologic and molecular testing for infectious diseases, with a particular focus on HIV testing.
Advances in Biomarker Testing for Sepsis and Bacterial Infections
Live Event: Wednesday, September 13, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until March 13, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides 

Systemic bacterial Infections are often difficult to differentiate from other infections. This can lead to a delay in appropriate treatment and sometimes overtreatment with antibiotics Both the clinical presentation and diagnostic tests are required to manage therapy. Timely, informed decisions can be made with the assistance of biomarkers. With the recently FDA approved claim extensions of Procalcitonin (PCT) clinicians now have an additional tool to help direct antibiotic therapy. This can result in reduced antibiotic usage, reduced time in ICU reducing the costs incurred by both patients and healthcare systems while improving clinical outcomes.

This webinar will provide a thorough understanding on how biomarkers are used in systemic bacterial infections and Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTI) and the laboratory’s role in helping direct patient therapy. It will analyze PCT as an infection biomarker with a review of the recently approved FDA claims and discuss the clinical application of the biomarker using case studies for LRTI and Sepsis.


This webinar will::
Identify the various biomarkers used to assess systemic infections
Discuss PCT as an infection biomarker with a review of the recently approved FDA claims
Define the role of PCT in the context of antibiotic stewardship
Describe the clinical application of the biomarker using case studies for LRTI and Sepsis

Presenter:
Eric Gluck MD, FCCP JD
Director, Critical Care Services
Swedish Covenant Hospital
Chicago, Illinois
Eric Gluck photo
Dr. Gluck is a Professor of Medicine at Finch University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School in North Chicago. He has previously held positions as an Assistant Professor at both Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center and the University of Connecticut. Dr. Gluck is Board Certified in Internal Medicine with subspecialties in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.
Genital Zoster Infections: An Unexpected Finding Using a Molecular Assay
Live Event: Thursday, July 27, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until January 27, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides 
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are common causes of cutaneous and mucocutaneous infections and typically distinguished based upon appearance and anatomic location. But atypical presentations of zoster can occur in unusual anatomical sites. Improved testing methods for the differentiation of HSV 1+2 and VZV from cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens allow for correct detection and diagnosis leading to better treatment and patient counseling.

Incorrect diagnosis of suspected HSV has psychosocial impacts that affect patient well being. Traditional culture methods for HSV and VZV can take between 24 hours and 2 weeks for results which can delay therapy and leave patients in the dark.

Molecular testing methods to diagnose and differentiate Herpes from Varicella Zoster can change treatment and patient counseling by providing definitive results in a timely manner to allow for more accurate treatment. 


This webinar will:
Discuss the importance of differentiating HSV from VZV specifically in genital lesions
Examine the ways in which a fast TAT for VZV can impact clinical care
Analyze the psychosocial impact of an incorrect diagnosis for HSV/VZV
Identify the treatment differences and positivity rates for VZV in patients suspected to have HSV



This webinar is sponsored by Fisher Logo and Quidel logo
Presenter:
Paul A. Granato, Ph.D., DABMM, FAAM
Professor Emeritus of Pathology
SUNY Upstate Medical University
Paul Granato pic
Dr. Granato earned his Ph.D. in microbiology and molecular biology from Syracuse University after graduating from Le Moyne College majoring in biology and chemistry. Dr. Granato directed several clinical microbiology laboratories over his professional career while serving as a faculty member in the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology at SUNY Upstate Medical University for over 35 years where he is now Professor Emeritus in Pathology.

Differentiating Gluten-Related Disorders Through Diagnostic Methods
Live Event: Monday, June 19, 2017  |  2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until December 19, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
Celiac Disease is an immune-mediated systemic disorder elicited by gluten and related prolamines in genetically susceptible individuals. Approximately 90% of CD patients are not yet diagnosed. 36% of CD patients are incorrectly diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome. The incidence of CD has increased from 5.2 per 100,000 persons in 1990 to 19.1 in 2010. Differentiation is critical since a gluten restricted diet is a burden for the patient and family.

Wheat is a grass, and one of the most common causes of food allergen sensitization in children. Some grass sensitized children can be misdiagnosed as wheat allergic who are recommended a wheat-free diet as whole wheat extract tests often show sensitization due to cross-reactivity between wheat and grass components e.g. profilin and CCD. Wheat is an ingredient in processed foods other than bakery products, for instance in beer which may elicit symptoms in allergen sensitized patients.

This session will present an update of our current understanding of the three main forms of reactions to wheat and its byproducts including gluten: allergic (wheat allergy), autoimmune (celiac disease) and intolerance (gluten sensitivity). The speakers cover testing cascades to differentiate patients efficiently, as well as the laboratory efficiency gains by processing these tests on a single automated platform.


This webinar will:
Discuss the prevalence, symptoms, and characteristics of three "gluten"- related disorders
Examine the reasons why "Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS)" is still a vague umbrella term encompassing distinct populations of patients
Identify the patients who would benefit from testing
Assess specific testing cascades to assist the clinician in the differentiation between "gluten"- related disorders
Presenters:
Stephano Guandalini photoStefano Guandalini, MD, is an internationally recognized expert on celiac disease. He is also known for his expertise in the research and treatment of other diarrheal diseases in children. Dr. Guandalini is the president of the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease, and has been ranked among America’s "Best Doctors" since 2008. 

Alessio Fasano photoDr. Alessio Fasano is chief of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition at Mass General Hospital for Children (MGHfC). He is a world-renowned pediatric gastro-enterologist, research scientist and entrepreneur. Dr. Fasano directs the Center for Celiac Research, specializing in the treatment of patients of all ages with gluten-related disorders, including celiac disease, wheat allergy and gluten sensitivity.
Vaginal Microbiota Investigations: Increasing Insight, Reducing Cost
Live Event: Tuesday, May 16, 2017  |  2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until November 16, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides

Urogenital infections, including bacterial vaginosis, urinary tract infections, and vaginitis, afflict over a billion women each year. In spite of the significant size of the affected population, there is a lack of awareness among CLIA labs for a multi-pathogen solution for screening vaginal microbiota. Current culture based methods for vaginal and urogenital microbiota lack sensitivity and specificity, and are subjective as well as inaccurate. Current molecular methods for bacterial vaginitis can have a high cost per sample, lack of flexibility in content and pathogenic targets, and are not amenable to centralized testing. Tests that are neither flexible in content, low cost per sample, nor sensitive enough to detect vaginal and urogenital microbiota can lead to further testing in order to get a finite answer for bacterial vaginitis investigations.

 

This webinar will discuss the increased sensitivity and specificity required for vaginal microbiota and pathogen investigations. It will also review the role of both pathogenic and commensal microbiota involved in urogenital infections, and identify the methods to detect a broad range of vaginal microbiota from a single sample quickly, and efficiently.





This webinar will:

Review the role of both pathogenic and commensal microbiota involved in urogenital infections

Identify the methods to detect a broad range of vaginal microbiota from a single sample quickly, and cost effectively

Discuss the practical application of the detection of a broad range of vaginal microbiota from a single sample

 

Presenters:
Don Stalons photo  Don Stalons, PhD
Director, Clinical Laboratory, Diatherix
Doug Rains photo  Doug Rains
CSO of Quantigen Laboratory in Fishers, IN 
Jeff Shaman photo  Jeffrey Shaman, PhD
Director of Business Dev.
Coriell Life Sciences  
Case Studies in Vaginitis
Live Event: Friday, March 31, 2017  |  2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until September 31, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
View Slides
Vaginitis is one of the most common gynecologic disorders seen in primary care It is a disorder that accounts for 10 million office visits and up to 7 percent of visits made to gynecologists. Although generally not regarded as a serious condition, it nevertheless has significant consequences in terms of pain and discomfort, days loss from work and school, sexual functioning, and altered self-esteem. In addition, over one billion dollars a year are spent on OTC medications and physician visits for this diagnosis.

This webinar will provide clinicians with a practical diagnostic approach to the patient presenting to the office with a vaginal discharge. In addition to helping the clinicians differentiate normal from abnormal, the webinar will also illustrate how integration of clues from the history and physical findings with skillful use of the office laboratory is essential for making an accurate diagnosis. This webinar will also address current challenges in diagnosing trichomonas and candida infections and review the effective management of common vaginal infections.




This webinar will:
Describe a differential diagnosis of the patient presenting with a vaginal discharge.
Analyze the role of the office laboratory in diagnosing vaginitis.
Identify the three most common causes of vaginitis and discuss the effective management of each.

Presenter:
Martin Quan, MD
Professor of Clinical Family Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Martin Quan photo

Dr. Quan is Professor of Clinical Family Medicine and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs, Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and is also Director, Office of Continuing Medical Education. He also serves as Senior Advisor to the President of the American Board of Family Medicine. He is a member of the Education Advisory Board and consultant to the Committee on Continued Professional Development of the California Academy of Family Physicians and a member of the Kidney Learning System Advisory Board of the National Kidney Foundation.
Tissue Archiving: Reality, Recommendations and Best Practices
Live Event: Thursday, January 26, 2017  |  1:00 - 2:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until January 26, 2018  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides
In today’s busy Pathology laboratories, more is being expected with fewer resources. Yet, archiving tissue paraffin blocks, retrieving them when necessary and then re-archiving them back into their original filed positions utilizes manpower resources. An estimated 3000 manual work hours are spent annually for a laboratory that processes 100,000 tissue blocks per year.1

More importantly, the traceability and accountability of tissue blocks are critical components to patient management. The risk of delay of diagnosis when tissue blocks go missing can lead to anxiety for the patient and the laboratory staff. In addition, lost tissue blocks can result in even more serious issues including risk of litigation and harmed reputation. As serious as lost patient diagnostic pathology slides can be, lost paraffin blocks are even more significant since any hope of retrieving a viable patient sample is lost forever.2

The purpose of this webinar is to review tissue block archiving guidelines in the US and other countries throughout Europe. It will review the past and current practice for archiving tissue blocks at Dr. Costes-Martineau’s laboratory at Montpellier University Teaching Hospital. And lastly, it will offer recommendations on best practices towards achieving overall improvement in tissue block archiving practices.

1Montpellier University Teaching Hospital, Montpellier, France
2Testing Biopsy & Cytology Specimens for Cancer,
www.Cancer.org



This webinar will:
Review tissue block archiving guidelines in the US and discuss how these regulations compare to those in other countries throughout Europe.
Examine how one laboratory achieved time-savings while improving compliance with their tissue block archiving system.
Identify best practices towards improving your laboratory’s efficiency in tissue block archiving.
Presenter:
Pr. Valérie Costes-Martineau, MD
Montpellier University Teaching Hospital, Montpellier, France
Photo Valérie Costes-Martineau
Dr. Costes-Martineau is Professor of Medicine at University Montpellier. She is the head of both the Department of Biopathology and of the Department of Biobanking at Montpellier University Teaching Hospital in France. Professor Costes-Martineau's main focus is Head and Neck (HN) Pathology. She is a member of the Scientific Board of the network for rare HN cancers which is granted by INCA, and in charge of HN Pathology Teaching organized by the Pathology French Society. She is also the president of the French HN Pathology society. Professor Costes-Martineau is the author of over 100 articles in peer reviewed scientific journals.
Molecular In Minutes: The Value of Molecular Testing for Infectious Disease
Live Event:
Wednesday, December 14, 2016  |  2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until June 14, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
Overuse of antibiotics is a significant global crisis. While physicians often prescribe treatment empirically rather than wait for diagnostic results, hospitals are faced with a financial burden for antibiotic resistant infections and C. difficile rates. As laboratories increasingly have the ability to deliver faster results, they can now also have more impact on the treatment patients receive. By helping to ensure that patients are placed on the most appropriate therapy, complications like C. difficile infection and the resulting increased length of stay can be better managed.



This webinar will:
Define the need for changing antibiotic prescribing habits at point-of-care
Discuss newer technologies that amplify nucleic acid
Explain how these technologies can apply to specific disease states




This webinar is sponsored by Fisher-Alere-logos 
Presenter:
Norman Moore, PhD
Director of Scientific Affairs for Infectious Disease, Alere
Norm Moore Photo
 
Dr. Moore received his bachelor’s degree in biology and philosophy from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of New Hampshire. He developed the first ever rapid tests for Legionella and S. pneumoniae, both of which are now recommended by the Infectious Disease Society of America for use in severe pneumonia cases, among other assays. Dr. Moore currently has six patents and numerous publications and presentations.
 
Rheumatoid Arthritis Diagnosis: Avoiding CCP False Positives
Live Event: Monday, October 24, 2016 | 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until April 24, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the second most common autoimmune disease, just behind autoimmune thyroid diseases, and more common than RA disease, antiphospholipid syndrome and autoimmune liver diseases. RA is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder affecting approximately 1.3 to 2.6 million (0.5 - 1%) adults, and 294,000 children in the US1. In nearby Canada, researchers found an incidence of 2 and 5 cases per 1000 residents, with prevalence in women over 45 close
to 1%2.

The cause of RA is unknown and there is no cure, however early treatment can help prevent irreversible joint damage, premature death, disability, and raise the patient’s quality of life3. In many geographic regions access to specialty care is limited. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) considers access to rheumatologists, and particularly, pediatric rheumatologists as one of their top 8 concerns.

Expanded management of patients is challenging in that the diagnosis is formed using established medical guidance criteria including the combination of physical exam, serologic testing and imaging. Understanding serologic test selection and interpretation can improve qualified referrals to help meet demand for specialty care. This webinar will address evidence-based approaches described in the American college of Rheumatology Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

This webinar will:
Review evidence-based approaches described in the American college of Rheumatology Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Discuss the importance of specificity in test selection, and optimal usage of two recommended serologic markers for RA, Anti-CCP and Rheumatoid Factor IgM
Analyze how test efficacy and disease prevalence impact result accuracy, and timely consultation or referral to a rheumatologist for patients in whom there is a high index of suspicion of RA



1 Helmick CG, Felson DT, Lawrence RC, et al. Estimates of the prevalence of arthritis and other rheumatic conditions in the United States. Part I. Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jan;58(1):15-25. doi: 10.1002/art.23177.
2 Broten L, Aviña-Zubieta JA, Lacaille D, et. Al. Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease prevalence in Canada: updated analyses across 7 provinces.JRheumatol. 2014 Apr;41(4):673-9. doi:10.3899/jrheum.130667.Epub 2014 Mar 1.
3 Herold M. Rheumatoid Arthritis. In: Shoenfeld Y and Meroni PL, ed. The General Practice Guide To Autoimmune Diseases. Lengerich, Germany: Pabst Science Publishers; 2012:63-71.

 
Presenter:
Teresa Tarrant, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Duke University School of Medicine Durham, North Carolina
Teresa Tarrant Photo
Dr. Tarrant is a clinical immunologist, board certified in allergy, immunology and rheumatology. She specializes in diseases of and related to rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögrens syndrome, inflammatory eye disease, CVID, and immunodeficiency in aging. In addition to her active medical practice, over the last 10 years, Dr. Tarrant has held two other major roles in her daily work; first as a medical liaison, where she assists in the evaluation and selection of immunoassays, including authoring or co-authoring peer-reviewed scientific articles of their evaluations, and secondly as an associate professor of medicine.
Comparing Biomarkers used in Infection, Sepsis, and Septic Shock:
What is the Role of Procalcitonin?
Live Event: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until March 13, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
Sepsis is the 6th most common principal diagnosis affecting 1 in 23 inpatients. The in-hospital mortality rate due to sepsis is 16%, which is nearly 8 times higher than the average inpatient mortality rate, and adversely impacts clinical outcomes for hospitals.

Septicemia is the second highest 30-day Medicare readmission diagnoses, resulting in 92,900 readmissions. Sepsis is the most expensive inpatient diagnosis with over $23B in aggregate hospital costs, accounting for 5.2% of all costs, but only 2.8% of discharges.

This webinar will help participants assess whether their current biomarker choices provide their clinicians with optimal clinical effectiveness. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a biomarker of the host's response to a systemic bacterial infection. The webinar will illustrate how PCT provides rapid insight on the severity of bacterial infection, the risk of progression to sepsis, and the risk of mortality.

This webinar will also review currently available biomarkers used for infectious disease diagnosis, sepsis, and septic shock.


This webinar will:
• Review currently available biomarkers used for infectious disease diagnosis, sepsis and septic shock
• Compare and contrast common biomarkers to determine which marker or group of markers can provide clinicians with effective clinical information
• Discuss the role of Procalcitonin (PCT) in sepsis management


Presenter:
Mike Broyles, BSPharm, PharmD,
Dir. Pharmacy and Laboratory Services
Five Rivers Medical Center, AR
Mike Broyles photo
Dr. Broyles is a Doctorate Prepared Pharmacist with 25 years of experience as a Hospital Pharmacy Director providing patients with current concepts in the clinical use of drugs. As the pharmacy advisory chairman for a large IDN, Dr. Broyles helps to develop and implement clinical initiatives. He consults for several IDN’s, Alaris, Cardinal Health, Carefusion, bioMerieux, ICNet, independently serving both small and large hospitals.
The Impact of Point-of-Care Hemoglobin Testing on Patient Blood Management
Live Event: Monday, August 22, 2016 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until February 22, 2017  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
RecordingView Slides 
Patient Blood Management (PBM) is an emerging clinical concept designed to reduce unnecessary, excessive and avoidable blood transfusions. Interest in PBM has grown rapidly throughout the world as new evidence demonstrates a strong association between transfusion and a variety of healthcare care complications (infections, pulmonary injury, and mortality). Reducing transfusion exposure in hospitals has the dual benefit of significantly reducing costs while improving safety and outcomes.

PBM programs often utilize a variety of resources and technologies to optimize blood management, including point-of-care testing. Point-of-care Hemoglobin testing has been widely used in hospitals and published in the literature as an evidence based strategy to support transfusion management. This webinar will focus on practical applications of POCT Hgb to improve the recognition and management of anemia, support the paradigm shift of RBC transfusion as single units with reassessment, and optimize transfusion decision making in the anemic or bleeding patient.


This webinar will:
Describe how optimal transfusion practice and patient blood management can result in reduced health care costs and improved patient outcomes
• Define how point-of-care Hemoglobin testing can improve recognition/management of anemia and transfusion decision making in the bleeding patient
• Examine the paradigm shift of RBC transfusion as single units with reassessment




Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's solutions for Patient Blood Management.
Presenter:
Joseph Thomas, BSN, RN
Regional Director, Blood Management - Accumen
Joe Thomas photo
Joseph Thomas is a registered nurse and currently serves as Regional Director of Patient Blood Management (PBM) for Accumen. Over the past 14 years Mr. Thomas has worked with over 125 hospitals to improve blood management and patient outcomes. Over this time he has educated and mentored thousands of physicians and nurses on transfusion and blood management related topics. Mr. Thomas is also a nationally recognized speaker and a published author in the field of blood management and transfusion safety.
Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection
Live Event: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until November 18, 2016  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
 RecordingView Slides
The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased dramatically since 2000. In 2011, there were 453,000 CDI cases in the US associated with over 29,000 deaths. The clinical microbiology laboratory plays a critical role in identifying patients who have CDI, and therefore also the initiation of preventive measures. At the end of the webinar, the participant will understand how CDI impacts patients, how to optimize CDI diagnosis, and how to prevent CDI.

This webinar will:
• Analyze the importance of C. difficile infection on patient outcomes
• Identify the advantages and disadvantages of C. difficile diagnostic assays
• Describe the role of the microbiology laboratory in the prevention of C. difficile infection




Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's solutions for Clostridium difficile testing.





This webinar is sponsored by Fisher-Alere-logos 


Presenter:
Erik R. Dubberke, MD, MSPH
Associate Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine
Dr. Dubberke Photo
Dr. Dubberke is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where he has been a faculty member in the Division of Infectious Diseases since 2005. His main research interests are in the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).
Cryptosporidium and Giardia Testing
Live Event: Tuesday, May 3, 2016  |  2:00 - 3:00 PM
PACE® credit available until November 3, 2016  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
View RecordingView Slides
In the United States, CDC estimates approximately 2 million annual cases of Giardia and Cryptosporidium combined. These numbers are likely underestimates of true infections due to the challenges of traditional diagnostic methods. The current gold standard for Giardia and Cryptosporidium detection is conventional microscopy, which is time consuming, requires expert technical skills, and is relatively insensitive. Additionally, Cryptosporidium diagnosis requires special staining methods that may or may not be considered by the ordering physician, potentially leading to missed diagnoses of cryptosporidiosis.

Manufacturers are continually improving upon diagnostic assays to enhance identification and detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium, resulting in a more accurate number of cases reported, better diagnosis of true infections, and improved patient care.

This webinar will:
• Discuss giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis disease and epidemiology
• Identify the strengths and weaknesses of gold standard methods
• Describe current diagnostic methods for detecting Giardia and Cryptosporidium in clinical specimens
• Review the impact these advanced methodologies have on improving diagnosis



Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's Cryptosporidium and Giardia Testing solutions.

This webinar is sponsored by  Fisher_Sekisui logos 
Presenter:
Shelley Miller, PhD, D (ABMM)
Clinical Instructor, UCLA
Shelley Miller pic
Dr. Shelley Miller completed a medical microbiology and public health postdoctoral fellowship at UCLA and became board certified by the American Board for Medical Microbiology.  She is currently a Clinical Instructor at the UCLA Clinical Microbiology Lab where she has clinical teaching responsibilities and also helps oversee clinical trial studies being conducted in the lab.
Minutes vs. Days: Rapid Diagnosis of Group A Strep
Live Event: March 30, 2016  |  3:00 - 4:00 PM
EDT
PACE® credit available until September 30, 2016  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
View RecordingView slides
Medical providers now have a number of new technologies available for the rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis. Dr. Schuman will present an overview of strep pharyngitis, signs, symptoms and complications with an emphasis on expediting diagnosis in the medical office. The role of the strep score with be reviewed and discussed regarding its clinical utility. Recommendations will be made for improving your current diagnostic technology.



This webinar will:
• Discuss clinical features of strep pharyngitis
• Analyze the utility of the modified strep score in diagnosing strep pharyngitis
• Identify the advantages and disadvantages of current "high tech" point of care rapid strep tests


Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's Strep A solutions.


 
This webinar is sponsored by  Fisher-Alere-logos 
Presenter:
Dr. Andrew J. Schuman
Geisel School of Medicine
Andrew Schuman photo
Andrew J. Schuman is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. He has been writing about office technology and medical practice in Contemporary Pediatrics for 28 years, and he is now on the Editorial Advisory Board of the publication.
A Healthy Response to Unhealthy Food: Diagnostic Testing for Wheat-Related Disorders 
Live Event: Monday, November 9, 2015 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
PACE® credit available until May 9, 2016  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
View RecordingView Slides
Researchers have found that there is a spectrum of gluten-related disorders, which includes diseases and conditions that result from the ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. This session will summarize our current knowledge about the three main forms of reactions to wheat and its byproducts including gluten: allergic (wheat allergy), autoimmune (celiac disease) and intolerance (gluten sensitivity), and outline pathogenic, clinical and epidemiological differences. 

This webinar will:
• Distinguish between wheat allergy, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity
• Analyze and define testing requirements to aid in the diagnosis of wheat allergy and gluten related disorders
• Advocate for accurate and timely diagnosis to improve patients quality of life
• Review literature to better understand the presentation of symptom, challenges of diagnosis and treatment options




Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's solutions for Celiac Disease testing
Presenter:
Stefano Guandalini, MD
University of Chicago Celiac Disease Ctr
Stefano Guandalini pic
 
Stefano Guandalini, MD, is an internationally recognized expert on celiac disease, a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. He is also known for his expertise in the research and treatment of other diarrheal diseases in children. Dr. Guandalini is the president of the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease, and has been ranked among America’s "Best Doctors" since 2008.
The Unseen Threat: Diabetes and the Cardiorenal Syndrome
Live Event: Wednesday, Oct 21, 2015 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until April 21, 2016  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
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The statistics are staggering. Nearly 29.1 million children and adults are living with diabetes in the U.S., and nearly 8.1 million (27.8%) Americans remain undiagnosed.1 Additionally, approximately 26 million Americans have kidney disease and are unaware of their condition.2

Diabetes poses a significant clinical burden to patients. Left untreated, serious complications can occur including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, lower-limb amputation and pregnancy complications. According to the International Journal of Nephrology (IJN)3, Cardiorenal Syndrome (CRS) is the umbrella term used to describe clinical conditions in which cardiac and renal dysfunctions coexist whereby “acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other.” A number of laboratory tests such as HbA1c, BNP, NT-proBNP, Albumin and Creatinine can assist clinicians in the management of this syndrome.

Given the continued rise of diabetes in the U.S., healthcare professionals need to be well-informed about Cardiorenal Syndrome, its pathophysiology, its connection with diabetes and understand the latest recommended guidelines for diagnosis and treatment.

This webinar will:
• Discuss the nature of Cardiorenal Syndrome and its pathophysiology connection with diabetes
• Review the prevalence of diabetes and kidney diseases in the U.S.
• Examine the latest guidelines from leading research groups on this topic
• Apply learnings to Cardiorenal Syndrome case studies

Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's Diabetes Testing solutions.
Presenter:
Nancy Haley PhD
Nancy Haley photo
Dr. Haley has published over 150 articles in peer reviewed journals and has written over 15 chapters in educational texts. She has lectured at several international meetings on cardiology and cancer risk and has appeared on Good Morning America, the Late Show with David Letterman, and the ABC World News with Peter Jennings.
Shiga Toxin: A Public Health Threat
Live Event: Tuesday, July 14, 2015 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT
PACE® credit available until January 13, 2016  |  Florida Laboratory CE Credit available
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Each year, there are roughly 211-375 million diarrhea cases in the United States leading to 73 million physician consultations, 3100 deaths, and $25 billion in healthcare costs. While the CDC estimates that 265,000 cases occur each year due to Shiga Toxin producing E. coli (STEC), it is still significantly underdiagnosed because appropriate diagnostic tests are often not performed. STEC can not only cause bloody diarrhea, but has complications like hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in children and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in adults.

When a patient presents with symptoms of STEC, rapid diagnosis is key to both improving the likelihood of a positive outcome and to helping contain any further contamination. The test must also be accurate because the wrong antibiotic treatment can actually exacerbate the toxin.

This webinar will:
• Discuss the clinical significance of Shiga Toxin producing E. coli (STEC) and its effect on public health
• Demonstrate how STEC can be transmitted and what foods are at highest risk.
• Review the ways in which STEC causes significant illness, especially in younger children
• Analyze the need for and how to test and treat for STEC.



Click here to learn more about Fisher HealthCare's Antimicrobial Stewardship solutions.


 
This webinar is sponsored by  Fisher-Alere-logos 
Presenter:
Norman Moore, PhD
Alere
Norman Moore photo

Dr. Moore received dual degrees in Biology and Philosophy from Dartmouth College and a PhD in Microbiology from the University of New Hampshire.  While at Digene Diagnostics, he developed tests for HPV, the etiological agent for cervical cancer. While at Gene Trak Systems, Dr. Moore developed diagnostics for food pathogens. Dr. Moore later joined Binax where he developed the first ever rapid tests for Legionnaires ’ disease, S. pneumoniae in urine, and many other tests. Dr. Moore is responsible for Scientific Affairs for infectious diseases at Alere.


 
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More Educational Resources POC Webinars
Fisher Healthcare's commitment to education extends to our sponsorship of many Point of Care Group webinars. These webinars are produced by Whitehat Communications and free to the point of care and laboratory community. You can register for upcoming webinars and view the recorded sessions for 2018 here:

Click here to register for any of the 2018 Point of Care group webinars

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